Tuesday, September 22, 2009

New batik patterns and glaze


I recently aquired a new batik stamp that is Persian in origin. It's got a much finer line detail than the Indian stamp I've been using and I wasn't sure how well the detail would get picked up when glazed. But, I just have to say I am pleased and this is a glaze combination that I could just use over and over again, and probably wouldn't get bored with for a while.

These are 4 of the little trays I fired yesterday. They are somewhere around 4 inches square. I love the orientation of the top right one. If you squint your eyes just right, it looks a little like a row of minarettes. I know some of you have wondered if I'll list any of these and I'm thinking that I've just about got figured out how to reasonably ship these in a safe way.

So here's the new glaze that I tweaked and tested yesterday. It's called ocean green and as far as I can see there is no ocean at all about it. It has also been described as a putrid brown and I find that a little harsh. On my white stoneware (left) I think it has a lovely autumnal feel to it. On porcelain (right), well, nothing to write home about, bit boring, bland.... but not putrid. Maybe putrid is an 'in the eye of the beholder' sort of judgement.


But that glaze overlays really nicely with the brown glaze I've been using on pots. The leaf on the right is just the brown glaze, which is OK but the one on the left, I am in love with. The detail shows the incredible crystal pattern that happened when I put the 'ocean green' over the brown. In the potter's world, this kind of crystal development is a whole science of it's own. Can I repeat it? Don't know, but I've got the small kiln going right now and we'll find out tomorrow.
Thanks everyone for stopping by my little corner!

18 comments:

Katie said...

Love that batik print you have going! You find some of the neatest patterns to work with, and you make them work so well :o)

I don't see putrid brown in that glaze at all, either. I think it's all in how you work with it and where you use it...I have some seed beads that, on their own, don't necessarily look beautiful, but when paired properly, they are wonderful...While there is skill required in all parts of this work, SO much of it has to do with knowing how to use color...

My cat is yelling, which means I've written enough :o) Can't wait to see what you'll come up with next!

SummersStudio said...

Katie, I completely agree that how you put colour to use is the essential ingredient. I often struggle with it though because you can't erase once you've glazed.

Mari said...

beautiful!!! love it!!

Marie Cramp said...

They look wonderful! You are right about the deatil on that leaf, it is really fantastic. I think those pendants will sell well for you. Keep up the great work :)

Marie

sharon said...

OK! I know that I am repeating myself a lot lately, but the print is beautiful, the glaze is astounding! My eyeballs are popping out and my jaw is falling to the floor, they are gorgeous!! If you decide to sell them will you save me one...I know someone that would really enjoy and appreciate this as a Christmas gift, someone who would love it as much as I do!!

Lisa ( nickname "L" ) said...

I absolutely LOVE the batik pattern and the glaze is perfect! :)

The Joy of Nesting said...

Oh Gads LeAnn!!
I'm right there with Sharon and I just hope that when we go to pick our "eyeballs" up to put back in our heads we get the right ones!!:)

Every time you show us a new glaze or creation I'm sure that's the most incredible one I've seen. Well it is until you pull another one out from your hat, and I'm over the moon again!! :) You are so gifted with the way you manipulate your glazes and coax such beautiful colors from them!!

Pattie ;)
Mazatlan Mx.

stregata said...

Oh LeAnn! You alchemist - in the true sense! You have created magic again! Those little leaves are sooo autumn! Beautiful! And the new batik stamp is absolutely amazing!

lunedreams said...

love it all! your new stamp is wonderful--totally different flavor. "ethnic" and less formal. and actually I like the "putrid brown" glaze--on your white stoneware it looks to me like really, really old ivory. Exactly like, but glossy. So there! Who can argue with antique ivory? Your last glaze experiment is indeed luscious! I've been really into that lately--kind of mustard-y browns with taupe-y grays. Love it!

SueBeads said...

You're right, they do look like minarettes! I love them! I don't think the brown is putrid, either. It's very fall-like. I know when I make beads, even though there are times when I don't care for colors, they grow on me, or other people like them. That's one lesson I learned in a glass class from Fig - just because I don't like it doesn't mean someone else won't love it!

Barbara Lewis said...

Oh My, LeAnn! Makes me want to make pots! Absolutely gorgeous work!

Cristi-2 If By Sea said...

That batik stamp is gorgeous! I collect batik fabrics and just love those types of patterns.

Cristi-2 If By Sea said...

That batik stamp is gorgeous! I collect batik fabrics and just love those types of patterns.

mairedodd said...

the batik stamp is truly gorgeous and i agree - they were a bit harsh with ocean green... it looks great the way you have used it ... yay for you...

SharonP said...

Huzzah! Great results from the kiln and I do like the "yellowed" ivory leaf.

SummersStudio said...

Thank you everyone for your lovely comments. I wish I could respond to each of you but I find myself flat out like a lizzard drinking.

Greer said...

Love the glazes. The alchemy of what they turn out like is always magic.

Esther said...

it's just magic!! this batik stamp id gogrpud znd what you did with it it's "magnifique"!!!!unique!